Featuring our charred timber cladding in Siberian Larch with varying widths and surface fixed for a project in North London.

Nicknamed “Darling House” which isn’t its official name, that’s confidential… Crawford Partnership designed away from the norm with this stylish inverted curve that defines a period in history. Hints of art deco coupled with the modern multi-grey bricks and wrapped around the charred cladding is the aluminium pressing.

In contrast and a real focal point to this project is a minute detail, this is the yellow door number, we love this, out of nowhere and perfectly placed. Other larger details such as the door reveals were calculated with precision and the use of multiple widths of cladding allows for exact alignment. The cladding also extended to the doors.

Tim Spiller from Crawford Partnership “We’ve been very happy with the product, and think it looks fantastic. Definitely on our list of products for other projects going forward, so looking forward to working again together too.”

Takage is the Japanese name for our Charred Siberian Larch Shou Sugi Ban cladding, it has been used in house building in many parts of the work for hundreds of years and continues to form part of extensions, newbuild projects as well as large commercial schemes.

Architect Alan Crawford “It does give a beautiful textural quality in contrast with the brick, whilst continuing the colour pallet used in the project. Hopefully you’ve seen the first-floor internal ceiling, with the timber glulam beams and the plywood finish to the ceiling.”

Credits and further information

Product                                    Charred Larch, Takage

Architect                                 Crawford Partnership  

Contractor                               Ingenious Construction

Awards                                     Finalist Bathroom Designer of the Year

Photographer                          Adam Butler

 

Comments...

  1. -

    Thank you for including our recently completed house in North London on your BLOG.

    We are very proud of the design and it was developed during many discussions with our client on the choices of materials, fixtures and fittings and also in the configuration of internal spaces.

    The Shou Sugi Ban cladding compliments the charcoal coloured brick and dark grey windows and provides an interesting weathered appearance to the new house and a maturity that respects and enhances its older Victorian neighbours in the setting of the Conservation Area.

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